What is the best time to achieve pregnancy naturally?

Harley Street Gynecologist Mahantesh Karoshi says Rule 1; You do not need to use ovulation kits to predict ovulation as these are costly and increases stress in the couple’s relationship.

So, the fact of the matter is that most women probably don’t need ovulation kits.

The London based gynecologist states that if  a  woman’s menstrual cycles are fairly regular, let’s say she gets her period in the range of 26 to 32 days, then having intercourse at specified times will produce just as many pregnancies as using an ovulation predictor kit would.

The false misconception is that woman must have intercourse on the day of ovulation in order to fall pregnant. Nothing could be further from the truth.

After intercourse, sperm can live for several days in the female genital tract system.

Studies show there is no significant difference in her chance for pregnancy whether she has intercourse on the day of ovulation or 1 to 2 days before ovulation.

However, the eggs (oocytes) don’t remain viable for very long, usually egg is viable for 24 hours after its release from the ovary. Intercourse that occurs just one day after ovulation is associated with a very low chance for pregnancy.

In order to maximize your chance for pregnancy, subtract 14 days from your shortest cycle (for example, if your shortest cycle is 26 days, subtract 14 to get 12). This will likely be the earliest you ovulate. Start having intercourse a five days before and repeat every other day a couple of times.

It is okay to have intercourse every day if you wish but the pregnancy rates will not be any better than they would be if you had intercourse every other day and it can get stressful for some couples. So, every other day is fine

Other methods that couples have used to attempt pregnancy are paying attention to the woman’s cervical secretions (mucous). This is based on the fact that as an egg is maturing in the ovary, the cells surrounding that egg will produce oestrogen.

As she gets closer to ovulation, the oestrogen levels get higher. Oestrogen will change the cervical mucus so that it becomes clearer and less thick and sticky. It will not tell you the precise time of ovulation however.

Many couples believe that looking at a woman’s temperature will predict ovulation. This is wrong. A woman’s temperature will only go up after ovulation. It will only tell you that ovulation occurred after the fact. This will not help increase your chances for pregnancy.

To visit Mahantesh Karoshi’s website click here

 

Fertility Problems

You may be struggling with many difficult feelings if you have fertility problems. Complex and often painful emotions are common for people with fertility problems, those who can’t have children and those having fertility treatment.
” People can feel guilt, fear and anger,” says Clare Brown, chief executive of Infertility Network UK, an infertility support network. “They can feel as though they’ve failed. People talk about feeling less of a woman, or less of a man. Depression and anxiety are common. Fertility treatment can be an intensely stressful experience. Most of us never imagine experiencing problems with having a child. When it happens, it’s a terrible shock.”
For those whose fertility problems prevent them from having children, there can be a sense of loss or grief. Brown says: “It’s almost a kind of bereavement for the child that this person expected to have. We can build our future around a plan to have children, and suddenly it’s taken away.”

Not all people who experience fertility problems feel this way. The 1.5 million people affected by fertility problems have all kinds of responses, says Brown. But for those who find themselves tackling difficult emotions, there is help.